Making a name in manure

Degelman dive deep with manure technology


Machinery
A Canadian built Degelman M34 manure spreader has been added to Morgan Pastoral Company's Queensland feed lot plant fleet. The spreader body includes a unique vertical flail system to minimise lumps but allow rocks to pass.

A Canadian built Degelman M34 manure spreader has been added to Morgan Pastoral Company's Queensland feed lot plant fleet. The spreader body includes a unique vertical flail system to minimise lumps but allow rocks to pass.

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When the manure spreader says stand back, take notice.

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Degelman rear discharge manure spreaders are making inroads with a unique flail beater system delivering consistent spread widths.

Distributed by Muddy River, Queensland dealer Vanderfield has two in operation with the latest heading to Morgan Pastoral Company’s feedlot operation near Dalby.

The Degelman M34 is the biggest of the two model range, accommodates 26 cubic metres and has a claimed spread width of up to 24 metres depending on the evenness required and material discharged.

However, Vanderfield product specialist, Grant Gossow said the machine would comfortably and consistently cover 12 metres making it ideal for most cropping systems.

“Most guys are buying them because it is the only one that does the 12 metres evenly,” he said.

“It can go up to 24 metres but it works comfortably to 12 metres and that fits in with implement widths and covers the country fast.”

The Degelman deals with manure straight from the feedlot, including slurry, without any need for composting or mixing.

The spreader design contrasts with many others on the market by running a flail system that is designed to not only reduce manure lumps but importantly, eliminate stone damage.

“The way the paddles are designed they smash the manure up very aggressively,” Mr Gossow said.

“But it is different to how the older auger type beaters work as the flails rotate out of the way if it hits rocks, only throwing them a few metres.”

The Morgan Pastoral Company machine is towed by a 295 kilowatt tractor and a smaller M28 version owned by local contractor Paul Wiecks needs about 250kW, Mr Gossow said.

“We sold that in about 2012 and it has had about 150,000 tonnes through it and he has only had to do up a few bearings,” he said.

“They are very well made machine with a bisalloy steel tub.”

A heavy duty hydraulic drive pto shaft transfers power to a rear gearbox and the twin vertical rear flails.

Suspension is by way of walking beam to help stability over rougher terrain and there is a hollow rubber sprung suspension hitch to minimise vibration between the machine and the tractor.

An electromagnetic floor belt drive system works on a drag basis rather than pushing from the front to lessen manure compaction.

Options includes weigh scales, disc brakes and hungry boards for added capacity.

 Mr Gossow said the brand was creating a lot of interest.

“You won’t find a stronger spreader,” he said.

“I'm expecting to sell a lot more because they are brilliant.

“The ‘stand back 500 feet’ sticker on the side always gets them - most people think it's some sort of war machine.”

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