This used to be a fun park: Abandoned tiny castle for sale south of Perth


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Now derelict and covered in graffiti, this former fun park south of Perth was a family favourite in the 1980s.

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The fate of an iconic Mandurah tourism park left abandoned for years may be known soon.

Part of the former Castle Fun Park site, on the corner of Old Coast Road and Leisure Way in Halls Head, has gone on the market, zoned for residential development.

In its heyday, the fun park was a popular stop for people making their way to or from Perth. Built in 1979, it comprised a miniature village including a replica of a Bavarian castle, an Australia-shaped swimming pool, mini-golf course, go-kart track and playground.

The park closed in the early 2000s due to declining visitor numbers. Many of the buildings were razed then and a couple of bushfires have torn through since. All that remains now is the graffiti-daubed castle and the derelict pool.

It is a place that holds fond childhood memories for many West Australians, including agent Adam Green, of Kevin Green Real Estate, who is selling the 1.05-hectare block near the prestigious waterfront homes of Port Mandurah.

"We used to come down to visit my gran and other family members and we would head over to the castle to have a wander round and explore the park," he said. "I was a lot shorter then so the buildings all seemed bigger and very exciting.

"The pool in the shape of Australia was always exciting and the park itself just always had a really nice feeling about it. Both my gran and my uncle have since passed away so it's nice to think back about the happy times."

The site - now owned by someone not associated with the original park - has been an issue of contention in recent years, with proposals for it to house a multi-storey retirement village and hospice or commercial showrooms.

Meanwhile, sections of the community have rallied for it to become a family-friendly recreational area again, with the castle restored to its former glory.

But Mr Green said he believed the castle - built by George Kaspar and inspired by King Ludwig II's Neuschwanstein Castle in Germany - was beyond repair.

"Unfortunately with everything like this, the squatters get in there and it's covered in graffiti and very smashed up," he said.

"I'd love to see a housing development go in there with maybe a small park in the middle with a replicated small castle or swing set in the shape of a castle to allow development to happen along with keeping a small memory of what used to be there."

Mr Green said the 1.05-hectare block had endless possibilities.

"The zoning has progressed from Special Development to a zoning that has a base of R30 but then allows further uses such as multiple dwellings up to R80, small-scale commercial uses such as shop, office, medical centre, child care," he said. "It is up to a buyer to discuss their future plans with council.

"This location is in a great spot that is only a stone's throw away from the Mandurah foreshore and all the restaurants, bars and facilities that this encompasses. It also leads down to the estuary and the new parklands in the Osprey Waters development."

Close to Bunnings and Halls Head Central shopping centre, lot 89 is on the market with a set-date sale for May 15.

Mr Green said there had already been interest from a couple of parties, who "see the chance to develop the property and gain a large parcel of land in a prime location".

Lot 88 - an adjoining 1358 square metres of land on the corner - is being sold through Prestige International.

It is not known what the owner plans for the remaining and biggest parcel of land, lot 90.

The median price for houses in Halls Head is $445,000 and has remained stable since 2016, according to Domain Group data.

For units, the median price is $291,000 compared with $315,000 in 2016.

Families make up 57 per cent of the population and 34 per cent of properties are fully owned.

The story This used to be a fun park: Abandoned tiny castle for sale south of Perth first appeared on The Sydney Morning Herald.

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