Australian icons in union

Australian icons in union

Sheep
Aa

WOOL has made a comeback on football fields with Australian Rugby Union (ARU) partnering with Australian wool.

Aa
Former 1960s Wallaby player Jim Miller wearing his Woolmark scarf on his sheep property "Cooininee", Jugiong, NSW. Photo: Food Miles Magazine

Former 1960s Wallaby player Jim Miller wearing his Woolmark scarf on his sheep property "Cooininee", Jugiong, NSW. Photo: Food Miles Magazine

WOOL has made a comeback on football fields with Australian Rugby Union (ARU) partnering with Australian wool.

ARU collaboration with Woolmark, the marketing arm of the Australian wool industry, will release supporter jerseys which are recreations of the 1937 and 1938 wool playing tops worn by the Wallabies in Test matches against South Africa and New Zealand.

Boorowa, NSW, woolgrower Murray Dymock said Merino wool and rugby played major roles in the community.

“To know that something you put your life into producing is now going into a product that supports the Wallabies is pretty good feeling,” Mr Dymock said.

Former Australian rugby union footballer turned woolgrower, Jim Lenehan, said he was enormously proud to be both a Wallaby and a woolgrower, “two things that I only ever did for the love of it”.

Wallaby players Nick Phipps and Bernard Foley.

Wallaby players Nick Phipps and Bernard Foley.

“There were a lot of blokes when I played that came from country areas, some of the top players,” Mr Lenehan said.

“I was a Wallaby for 10 seasons but for over 50 seasons I’ve been a woolgrower - that makes me feel very privileged.” ​

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by