Harvesting data for decisions

Claas data collection backs twin rotor Lexicon


Machinery
Claas Harvest Centre monitored data logged using the Claas telematic monitoring and diagnosis system in their Lexion 700 headers over four years

Claas Harvest Centre monitored data logged using the Claas telematic monitoring and diagnosis system in their Lexion 700 headers over four years

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Claas data collection backs twin rotors

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FARMERS looking to purchase a header may want to look into the maths.

Manufacturer Claas has joined the “big data” bandwagon pooling performance data collected from more than one hundred Lexion 700 headers in an effort to understand the economics behind harvesting. 

After four years of data collection, Claas have made the conclusion that twin rotor machines may have a fit in the medium hectare market.  

Jono Ham, Lexion product manager for Claas Harvest Centre said the data shows the lifetime cost of ownership of a twin rotor combine harvester is often less than a single rotor based on productivity and efficiency measures.

Dual rotor combine harvesters have long been ‘pigeon-holed’ as being suitable only for large-scale cropping operations or contractors due to perceived cost - Jono Ham

“Dual rotor combine harvesters have long been ‘pigeon-holed’ as being suitable only for large-scale cropping operations or contractors due to perceived cost,” he said.

Mr Ham said the data showed Lexion 700 headers were routinely peaking at 70 to 85 tonnes/hour of throughput, with an average of between 30 and 45 t/h in wheat crops over an operating interval of 10 to 13 hours.

The data was collected using the Claas remote telematic monitoring and diagnosis system, said Mr Ham.

“This is real world data, all we’ve done is put the data in a spreadsheet and calculate the averages,” he said.

“Some machines are recording twice the average and conversely, some are doing less, but the results tell a consistent story – a twin rotor machine allows you to harvest more grain per hour, more hectares per hour and more hours per day.

“Everything about farming is time-critical, whether it’s sowing, spraying or harvesting, so it makes sense to invest in technology that improves your productivity when it’s most important.”

Mr Ham said the data also revealed impressive fuel efficiency in the Lexicon models of about 70 to 80 L/hour.

“This is thirty to fifty litres less than the industry norms,” he said.

“Multiply that figure by say, twenty days, and this represents a significant saving in its own right.”  

We’ve found that the cost of ownership of various makes and models can vary by up to twenty percent - Jono Ham

Mr Ham said growers could contact their local Claas Harvest Centre to access the calculator, which compared the performance of over forty different models from leading manufacturers.

“The calculator incorporates the customers data or assumptions for crop yields, operating speed, grain losses, fuel efficiency, parts, service and financial details to determine the cost of ownership on a per tonne, hectare or rotor hour basis,” he said

“We’ve found that the cost of ownership of various makes and models can vary by up to twenty percent.

“There is no one-size-fits-all solution, but we can definitely say that in many situations, the lifetime cost of ownership of a twin rotor combine harvester is less than a single rotor machine.”

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