AWI builds capacity in wild dog control

AWI builds capacity in wild dog control

Wool Extra brought to you by AWI
Back Left: Marty Bower, SA; Michael Freeman, Vic; Brett Carlsson, QLD; Meja Aldrich, WA; Bruce Duncan, NSW; Isabel Martin, AWI; Huw Nolan, University of New England; Rhys Arnott, NT; Dave Worsley, NSW; Front left: Lucy-Ann Coby, Vic; Wendy Allen, NWDAP; Greg Mifsud, CISS; Riccarda Brindley, NWDAP; Ian Evans, AWI; Skyela Kruger, QLD.

Back Left: Marty Bower, SA; Michael Freeman, Vic; Brett Carlsson, QLD; Meja Aldrich, WA; Bruce Duncan, NSW; Isabel Martin, AWI; Huw Nolan, University of New England; Rhys Arnott, NT; Dave Worsley, NSW; Front left: Lucy-Ann Coby, Vic; Wendy Allen, NWDAP; Greg Mifsud, CISS; Riccarda Brindley, NWDAP; Ian Evans, AWI; Skyela Kruger, QLD.

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Advertiser content: With more watering points in pastoral areas and a greater urban interface in the agricultural zones, wild dogs are encroaching on the sheep and cattle industries across the country.

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With more  watering  points  in  pastoral  areas  and  a  greater  urban  interface  in  the  agricultural  zones,  wild  dogs  are  encroaching  on  the  sheep  and  cattle  industries  across  the  country.

To  combat  this  problem,  AWI  funds  and  co-funds  wild  dog  coordinators  in  each  state  where  sheep  and  wool  producers  are  affected  by  wild  dog  attacks  to  support  landholders  and  communities.

Last  week  these  coordinators,  along  with  other  state  and  territory  coordinators,  met  in  Toowoomba,  QLD,  for  a  three-day  workshop  and  skills  update.

The  workshop  shared  regional  updates  and  developments  in  R&D,  communications  and  community  engagement  skills,  knowledge  and  experience  and  developing,  implementing  and  evaluating  local  and  regional  pest  animal  management  plans.

Although  each  region  had  their  specific  challenges,  across  the  country  the  biggest  challenge  for  controlling  wild  dogs  is  the  sustained  engagement  of  landholders  and  the  community.

Greg  Mifsud,  the  National  Wild  Dog  Management  Coordinator  with  the  Centre  for  Invasive  Species  Solutions,  said  that  a  sustained,  collaborative  approach  was  needed.

“It  is  the  cooperation  between  groups  involved  in  the  issue  that  ensures  the  success  of  wild  dog  control.

“This  includes  the  collaboration  between  landholders,  whether  they  be  livestock  or  other,  with  government,  council,  and  the  community  and  industry  groups  in  the  region.

“By  creating  and  fostering  this  network  of  engaged  and  active  participation,  wild  dog  control  can  be  achieved.”

Ian  Evans,  AWI͛s  Program  Manager,  Vertebrate  Pests,  said  the  three-day  workshop  is  designed  to  build  capacity  within  the  team  of  wild  dog  coordinators  across  the  country. 

“AWI  has  a  long-term  outlook  on  wild  dog  control.  Part  of  this  outlook  is  to  facilitate  the  professional  development  of  the  AWI  funded  and  co-funded  coordinators.

“Wild  dog  attacks  have  decimated  sheep  numbers  in  many  parts  of  Queensland  and  the  problem  is  widespread  across  Australia,  but  with  the  support  of  coordinators,  landholders  and  groups,  we  are  able  to  get  on  top  of  the  problem,” Mr  Evans  outlined.

“Having  coordinators  in  these  crucial  areas  is  strengthening  our  approach  in  protecting  the  nation͛s  sheep  flock  and  supporting  communities  who  are  emotionally  and  financially  effected  by  wild  dog  attacks.

“By  bringing  together  these  professionals,  the  workshop  provided  the  opportunity  for  people  to  learn  from  the  experiences  of  others  and  facilitate  collaboration  between  local,  regional,  state  and  national  control  initiatives.”

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The story AWI builds capacity in wild dog control first appeared on The Land.

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