Wax wraps making most of honey by-product

Wax wraps making most of honey by-product


Horticulture
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Not wanting to waste leftover beeswax, Amy decided to give them a wrap.

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CLEVER: Bundaberg entrepreneur, Amy Lawrence, is utilising leftover beeswax to recyclable produce wax wraps for sealing food containers.

CLEVER: Bundaberg entrepreneur, Amy Lawrence, is utilising leftover beeswax to recyclable produce wax wraps for sealing food containers.

AMY Lawrence is not just minding her own beeswax; she's turning it into a practical kitchen item. 

Amy is the brains behind Get Wrapped in Beeswax Wraps.

What's a beeswax wrap you ask? 

They are 100 per cent cotton cloths coated in a mixture of beeswax, tree resin and jojoba oil. 

The reusable wraps can be used to seal containers or wrap food in for freshness, lessening the need for disposable plastic. 

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The wraps come in a variety of patterns and sizes. 

RANGE: The wraps are available in many different colours and patterns.

RANGE: The wraps are available in many different colours and patterns.

The idea stemmed from ready access to a supply of beeswax, courtesy of her farming husband.  

"We keep bees for honey and my husband was bringing home the excess wax. I started to look into other uses for the wax and came across beeswax wraps," Amy said. 

SEALED: The wraps will seal most containers by being pressed over the opening, with the heat from the user's hands helping to mould it.

SEALED: The wraps will seal most containers by being pressed over the opening, with the heat from the user's hands helping to mould it.

Adding to the attraction of the product is its home-grown nature. 

"I try to source all my materials from Australia so I know what I'm using," she said. 

"All materials are natural and biodegradable so once the wrap's lifespan is up they can just be buried in the backyard." 

The response from the community within her home town of Bundaberg, Qld, has been encouraging. 

"People have been keen to give them a go," Amy said. 

"They usually buy small to test them out first and then come back for more and bring their friends.

"There's a great variety of funky designs. Kids are loving them in their lunch boxes and they're great for entertaining.

EARTH: Amy says using the recyclable wraps reduces landfill by eliminating the need for disposable plastic film.

EARTH: Amy says using the recyclable wraps reduces landfill by eliminating the need for disposable plastic film.

"The wraps have about a 12-month lifespan and then you just dig a hole and bury them; no adding to landfill, which is a small way we can lessen our waste footprint." 

Beeswax's diverse attributes could provide further exploration for Amy in the future. 

"The wraps are keeping me busy at the moment but I do enjoy dabbling in face and body products so who knows, one day I might sell them too," she said.

The story Wax wraps making most of honey by-product first appeared on Good Fruit & Vegetables.

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