Seed singulation on the rise

Case IH on seed singulation and precision plant tech


Machinery
ON THE MOVE: A Magnum 380 working with the Early Riser 2130 planter. Case IH said the design features the industrys most accurate planter technologies.

ON THE MOVE: A Magnum 380 working with the Early Riser 2130 planter. Case IH said the design features the industrys most accurate planter technologies.

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Case IH talk seed singulation and precision plant technology

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Overseas research indicates there could be profit to be made by using precision planters and seed singulation across a wider range of winter and summer crops.

Case IH Australia product specialist Andrew Kissel said while Case IH had historically geared its precision planting business toward the cotton industry, the company was now looking at how the technology could benefit other commodities.

"There are some markets that really benefit from technology in precision planters that we really haven't really talked about before in Australia," he said.

"One of the things I have identified as a strategic priority over the next 12 to 24 months is to get involved with research and grower groups, specifically in crops like canola, peanuts and chickpeas, those products that have historically not been sown with a precision planter in Australia.

UP EARLY: The row unit on the Early Riser 2130 planter aims to ensure faster emergence.

UP EARLY: The row unit on the Early Riser 2130 planter aims to ensure faster emergence.

"We have seen tremendous agricultural results, specifically in western Canada, so we are looking to do similar research here."

Mr Kissel said the accuracy and precision gained from a precision planter, such as the Case IH Early Riser, could benefit a wide range of crops.

"Just from the ability to be able to singulate that seed and put one seed down in the right spot, in the right growing environment, and really do each seed as accurate as possible," he said.

"If you look at work we have done globally, we have seen seeding rates be reduced anywhere between 20 and 70 per cent, while maintaining the same yield.

"Which is pretty exciting when you look at what that does for profitability, particularly on the high dollar commodities."

Mr Kissel said seed singulation and precision planting wasn't just about variable rate seeding, though it could facilitate that. It was about increasing the agronomic potential of every seed.

"The Case IH Early Riser has accuracy at every single level, every single row is essentially its own controlled unit that does exactly what it needs to do to put the seed in the best possible environment," he said.

"It is unique compared to traditional seeding tools, they do a good job on a big scale, and are what we have always used, so we are very comfortable with them, but don't necessarily put every single seed in the right agronomic environment."

Mr Kissel said Case IH had chosen canola as a likely crop to benefit from the technology based on data from overseas.

"This is something we are working on right now and we are trying to find partners to work with from an agronomic point of view, to conduct the research," he said.

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