New season lambs hit the market

New season lambs hit the market

Sales
OUT AND ABOUT: Ryan Hussey, Rodwells Wangaratta, with client John Fuge, who sold suckers for a top of $192 a head at Corowa, NSW.

OUT AND ABOUT: Ryan Hussey, Rodwells Wangaratta, with client John Fuge, who sold suckers for a top of $192 a head at Corowa, NSW.

Aa

Prices for lambs are reflecting supply and seasonal conditions in different production areas, leading to mixed trends.

Aa

Prices for lambs are reflecting supply and seasonal conditions in different production areas, leading to mixed trends.

Competition faded in the south, while northern markets went full steam ahead.

Producers, however, at northern markets are starting to push unfinished new season lambs into selling centres in response to the deteriorating weather.

The season has dictated the extreme difficulty in growing a lamb into a decent slaughter weight.

For example, the Riverina and western NSW farming regions have made the heartbreaking decision to cut their crops for hay due to lack of rain and a number of severe frosts across the region.

In contrast, southern Victorian farmers are still waiting for paddocks to dry out.

In the meantime, old lamb numbers at their selling centres continued to decline.

At Bendigo, new season lambs have begun to enter the market, but the bigger numbers are perhaps a few more weeks away.

Meanwhile, Ballarat will commence its sucker season mid to late October, where big yardings of 40,000 plus will be the weekly norm.

At Wagga Wagga in NSW numbers climbed to 33,400 lambs and just over 15,000 sheep, including 14,300 sucker lambs.

The quality of trade and heavy suckers was outstanding, with plenty of weight in the offering.

New season trade lambs sold either side of firm to average 830 cents a kilogram, while the heavy portion sat at 800c/kg cwt.

Lamb prices increased slightly on Monday, as the market began to find its spring price groove.

Lamb supply at Bendigo on Monday improved to 12,247, with new season lambs accounting for half the yarding.

Young new season trade lamb quality was quoted as impressive and prices crept up, staying above 800c/kg cwt.

The 22-24kg lambs topped at $215, to average 804c/kg cwt.

Heavy young lambs gained $5-$6, making $213-$237 and averaging 829c/kg cwt.

Lamb producers at Corowa, NSW, pulled back supplies and prices lifted in response.

The market for new season lambs was firm to $5 dearer, to average 844c/kg cwt.

The heavy portion was limited, making $211-$230.

Old trade lambs gained $7, to average 779c/kg cwt.

Heavy old lambs topped at $230, averaging 792c/kg cwt.

The market at Ballarat regained its composure somewhat as fewer numbers entered the saleyards.

National Livestock Reporting Service reported better outcomes for trade lambs, making $146-$192.

Heavy lambs were limited, selling from $190-$215.

The general run of mutton sold firm to $9 dearer, the bulk of the offering was off-shears.

Merino ewe mutton averaged 577c/kg cwt.

Heavy crossbred sheep sold at $150-$190.

The story New season lambs hit the market first appeared on Stock & Land.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by