Barnaby Joyce rejects rebel group tag, but open to crossing floor

Barnaby Joyce rejects rebel group tag, but open to crossing floor

Politics
OPEN CROSSING: Barnaby Joyce says he's open to crossing the floor, but there's not 'rebel group'. Photo: Sitthixay Ditthavong

OPEN CROSSING: Barnaby Joyce says he's open to crossing the floor, but there's not 'rebel group'. Photo: Sitthixay Ditthavong

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Barnaby dismissed claims he was part of a renegade bloc.

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BARNABY Joyce has warned the Prime Minister that he and two of his Nationals colleagues are prepared to vote down government legislation, but rejected the tag of "rebel group".

Mr Joyce, George Christensen and Llew O'Brien are allegedly disgruntled that none of those who supported Mr Joyce in his failed leadership challenge were elevated in the subsequent cabinet reshuffle, but Mr Joyce declined to comment on the matter.

However, the New England MP did dismiss claims the three would work together as a renegade bloc.

"No, I don't see it as a rebel group at all," Mr Joyce said.

When asked how Mr Joyce would describe the group, he replied: "describe any way you wish".

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"I don't see it as a rebel group, no one is so flippant to arbitrarily do something like that on a whim," Mr Joyce said.

"I won't comment any further, it's not for me to comment on the position of others."

Mr Joyce phoned Prime Minister Scott Morrison to warn him he would cross the floor and vote against the government if he disagrees with the legislation.

The New England MP said there were no specific issues he had in mind to cross the floor on, but maintained it was a "democratic right".

"It is your right to democratic expression, especially on the backbench where you're not bound by cabinet solidarity," he said.

At a recent Coalition party room meeting, Mr Joyce and Mr Christensen were in vocal opposition of any proposed action on climate change, despite the concerns of some Liberal MPs.

Deputy Prime Minister and Nationals leader Michael McCormack has flagged potential changes to the inner workings of the party room, which would make it harder to initiate a leadership spill .

"The proposed changes are something I didn't agree to," Mr Joyce said.

"It limits the democratic expression and the rule of the room.

"How votes work in every other section of parliament is greater than 50 per cent, how votes work in an election is greater than 50 per cent

"It seems odd you to have a key vessel of democracy bound by a 70 per cent vote."

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