Dairy Australia face-to-face events cancelled

Dairy Australia face-to-face events cancelled due to coronavirus

ADF News
EVENTS CANCELLED: Dairy Australia regional development programs have cancelled most face-to-face events, including farm workshops and field days.

EVENTS CANCELLED: Dairy Australia regional development programs have cancelled most face-to-face events, including farm workshops and field days.

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Dairy Australia regional development programs around the country have cancelled upcoming face-to-face meetings and events in line COVID-19 recommendations.

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Dairy Australia regional development programs around the country have cancelled upcoming face-to-face meetings and events in line COVID-19 recommendations.

Cancelled events include workshops, discussion groups, Young Dairy Network meetings, research projects and one-on-one visits such as Taking Stock.

Major events including the Tasmanian Dairy Conference and Great South West Dairy Awards have been cancelled.

But all groups are looking to increase contact with farmers either online, via videos, podcasts and webinars, or by phone, including teleconference meetings.

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Dairy Australia is providing advice to ensure farmers, their families, staff and communities are safe and well as the situation around coronavirus (Covid-19) evolves.

The dairy industry has a dedicated group that is actively monitoring the situation and meeting regularly to manage the impact for dairy farmers and the wider industry.

Dairy Australia said dairy farmers had a number of options to prepare their business and make contingency plans, including considering:

  • Protecting staff from exposure - consider international visitors, people returning from overseas from at risk areas, and consider self-isolation if staff unwell.
  • Potential impacts on the business and ability to operate.
  • Operating with limited labour due to staff having to self-isolate following travel or closure of schools or childcare.
  • What goods (e.g. chemicals) they relied on to keep their business going in the coming three to four months. Contact suppliers to secure goods or source alternatives.

Dairy Australia said at this point the World Organisation for Animal Health and the Australian Veterinary Association indicated there is no evidence that livestock can contract or spread the disease.

Where possible, dairy farmers should enact a biosecurity plan, which can be created using Dairy Australia's Biosecurity tool.

This includes procedures around:

  • Farm visitors.
  • Thorough business hygiene practices for staff.

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