War of words: Qld says NSW border may stay closed until September

War of words: Qld says NSW border may stay closed until September

Coronavirus
WARRING WORDS: Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the border could remain closed until September, which NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro labelled as ridiculou.

WARRING WORDS: Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the border could remain closed until September, which NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro labelled as ridiculou.

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The Queensland border could remained close for another four months, which has lead to a war of words between the two state governments.

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THE Queensland border to NSW could remained close for another four months, which has lead to a war of words between the two state governments.

There had been hopes the Queensland government would lift the border closure - which requires people travelling into the state from NSW to self-isolate for two weeks - to help stimulate both states' economies.

However, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said ending the interstate travel restrictions "would look more positive towards September".

It's estimated that Queenslanders spent a total of 17 million nights in NSW per annum, which is worth $3.4 billion a year or an average of $65 million a week.

NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro said the one-way closed border was having an impact on businesses and labelled the situation as "ridiculous".

"Here we are, we've got the Prime Minister who mapped out a three-stage plan to recovery and that [means] opening industry, opening domestic travel," Mr Barilaro said.

"Queensland, they're beating their chest about putting in a bid for Virgin, yet they've got their border closed. It's ridiculous. The virus numbers are down, the border should be open.

"Victoria and NSW never closed their borders. This idea that borders should be shut doesn't even make sense."

The NSW Treasurer Dominic Perrottet quipped he "looked forward to the day when the people of NSW can move as freely across the border with Queensland as our GST dollars do".

Queensland's Deputy Premier Steven Miles returned the serve.

"We know Sydney can be dreary, but hang in there," Mr Miles said.

Ms Palaszczuk said the decision would be based on expert advice regarding the level of community transmission, and reviewed at the end of each month.

But with both NSW and Queensland beginning to loosen restrictions, community transmission is expected to increase, if only slightly, rather than decrease.

"At the end of the day, I really hope that we see an Australia where people can travel freely once again through all of our borders because that's the way that we work best together," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"But we're just in this unusual circumstance at the moment that no one wants to be in. So we have to take the health advice. But it's great to see some of the restrictions easing and people travelling around."

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