A strange, fresh look at what's travelling behind you

Eyeball cameras and screens will replace decades of old-fashioned car wing mirrors

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These strange eyeball cameras are used instead of wing mirrors on Audi's new electric car arriving in a few months

These strange eyeball cameras are used instead of wing mirrors on Audi's new electric car arriving in a few months

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No more wing mirrors; cameras are the newest technology for a driver's rear vision, says Audi

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It's the stuff of automotive science fiction, and it's coming to a car near you very soon.

From September, Audi's new production electric car will no longer have plain old reflective wing mirrors on either side but high definition cameras - and it's another step forward for road safety.

Where a mirror simply reflects what's behind the car, the high definition camera enhances it, and eliminates the issues.

More importantly, there's no chance of a driver being dazzled by some inconsiderate driver's high beam light from behind because the cameras automatically ramp down the dazzle.

In poor weather conditions such as drizzle and low light, the "eyeball" camera produces more clarity.

The vision captured by the cameras is projected onto touch-sensitive organic light-emitting diode screens sitting inside the doors near the door latches, which means that the driver's reflex action of glancing across to check what's behind doesn't really change.

Audi's new screens replace conventional wing mirrors

Audi's new screens replace conventional wing mirrors

It's the first time that twin wing cameras, sitting outboard from the Audi's doors like small pods, have been used on a production car sold here.

It required the German car maker to submit the technology for inspection by Australian certifiers to ensure it satisfied Australian Design Rules.

When driving on the highway, turning or reverse-parking, the cameras automatically tilt to provide an optimum field of view.

The virtual exterior mirrors will be a feature on the new Audi e-tron electric vehicle which has electric motors on the front and rear axles, and has an advanced liquid-cooled battery pack capable of being 80 per cent recharged in 30 minutes.

It also provides the driver with constant real-time information about what charging stations are nearby and whether they are in use. Prices for the e-tron start at $137,700.

The story A strange, fresh look at what's travelling behind you first appeared on The Canberra Times.

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