Flour mill sensor project shows promise

Flour mill sensor project shows promise

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Ken Quail, AEGIC general manager of research and technical services, says a flour milling pilot project shows a lot of promise.

Ken Quail, AEGIC general manager of research and technical services, says a flour milling pilot project shows a lot of promise.

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A project using low cost sensors to help predict flour quality could have big implications for millers.

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A PROJECT conducted by the Australian Export Grain Innovation Centre (AEGIC) could have big implications for flour millers across the globe.

Speaking at last week's Australian Grains Industry Conference (AGIC) Asia event, AEGIC's research and technical services general manager Ken Quail said the organisation had set up a pilot program using low cost sensors, developed by AEGIC, to help in flour mills.

The project involved setting up multiple sensors across the mill which could detect quality parameters such as protein, moisture and ash levels. The sensors provide in-line analysis and give results in near real time.

Dr Quail said the system had worked well in trials.

"We generate a prediction of things like ash levels based on the information the sensors have given us and the promising thing is that there is a good correlation between the levels predicted by the sensors and the final quality results after the product was tested," Dr Quail said.

He said the technology could be a great boost for flour millers and that the sensors were cheap and readily available.

"If they can accurately predict the quality of their product it will allow them to make decisions earlier."

Dr Quail said AEGIC would be happy to work with buyers of Australian grain around improving their milling efficiencies.

"We see that as a big role of ours, providing that technical support to our customers and helping them get the very best out of the Australian grain they purchase," Dr Quail said.




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