Exciting plant virus detection work

Exciting plant virus detection work on trial at Horsham

Cropping
Solomon Maina, Agriculture Victoria, says new virus detection technology has exciting implications for the grains industry.

Solomon Maina, Agriculture Victoria, says new virus detection technology has exciting implications for the grains industry.

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A scheme using genome sequencing to develop quicker and more accurate plant virus detection is on trial at Horsham.

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AGRICULTURE Victoria is working on an Australia-first method of improving plant virus detection that could help speed up the quarantine process.

At the conclusion of this research project, Horsham's Grains Innovation Park will be the first facility in Australia to apply high throughput genome sequencing methods for Post Entry Quarantine (PEQ) for grains.

Since 2018, Agriculture Victoria research scientist Solomon Maina has been working towards developing this method to screen grains for exotic viruses that are a threat to Australian biosecurity.

Dr Maina said the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) and Agriculture Victoria co-invested project aims to apply these new genome sequencing methods to prevent new pathogens entering Australia that may cause significant damage to the grains industry.

"The new methods would enable researchers to detect multiple viruses which have high genetic variability genome structures at once, with no prior information of the pathogen," Dr Maina said.

"In comparison with traditional methods, for example, the current use of antibodies which is limited to antisera availability may not detect viruses with high genome variations," he said.

"The researcher would need to initially suspect an infection in order to test for a specific virus in a crop."

These methods are expected to be adopted at the PEQ facility at Horsham.

Such frameworks have already been adopted on different crops in the United States and parts of Europe as part of their genetic certification programs.

However, Australia is leading this framework for grains.

The preliminary results at the Grains Innovation Park have proved promising, revealing simultaneous detection of multiple exotic and endemic viruses of pulses currently available at Horsham PEQ.

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