Marine companies tie knot to bring back sails on cargo ships

Now hear this, sails could be making a comeback on cargo ships

Machinery
SHIP AHOY: Giant solid sails could become a common sight again on the world's vast shipping fleet.

SHIP AHOY: Giant solid sails could become a common sight again on the world's vast shipping fleet.

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The global sea freight industry may be heading back to sails to cut its carbon footprint.

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The global shipping industry could be heading back to the days of sail.

Two international marine companies have tied the knot on an agreement to design and market solid wing sails up to 45 metres high which would be fitted to the decks of bulk cargo ships. The sails can be raised up and down.

The WindWings would harness wind power and could offer the shipping industry up to 30 per cent savings in fuel costs along with reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

The partnership between UK-based BAR Technologies and Norway-based Yara Marine Technologies will build on a project already underway to retrofit WindWings on Cargill bulk carriers with the first delivery expected next year.


Yara Marine will offer BAR's WindWings to ship owners globally and manage the procurement, construction, installation, service and training for the WindWings.

BAR Technologies was spun off from Ben Ainslie Racing (BAR) in 2016 to commercialise technologies developed in America's Cup yacht racing.

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The International Maritime Organisation is targeting a 30pc reduction in the shipping industry's carbon footprint by 2030.

CEO of BAR Technologies John Cooper said the time was right to market WindWings across the shipping industry.

"Working with Yara to deliver the first installation of WindWings for Cargill sets the benchmark as a true industry first and we believe that the combination of expertise afforded by all parties marks out the technology for long-term commercial success."

CEO of Yara Marine Technologies Thomas Koniordos said WindWings was an innovative product capable of helping decarbonise the sea freight sector.

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