John Deere feels it has the pick of the pickers

John Deere feels it has the pick of the pickers

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John Deere is excited at the launch of its new cotton harvesting equipment.

John Deere is excited at the launch of its new cotton harvesting equipment.

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A new line of cotton pickers and strippers has hit the market.

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JOHN Deere is excited about its new range of cotton harvesters, saying its CP770 cotton picker and CS770 cotton stripper, both designed for the unique conditions in the Australian cotton industry, will meet customer demand for greater power and precision.

John Deere Australia and New Zealand production system manager, Ben Kelly, said the CP770 and CS770 harvesters have been redesigned from the ground up and were more powerful, along with having greater precision ag capabilities.

The machines are fitted with John Deere's bolstered 13.6 L PowerTech engine, which in the Tier 4 range.

Along with the solid operational power, Mr Kelly said advances had been made that increased fuel efficiency by 20 per cent for the CP770 and up to 15pc for the CS770.

"The CP770 Cotton Picker and CS770 Stripper machines will increase productivity during harvest, while at the same time giving farmers and contractors simple, easy-to-use and impactful access to their farm and equipment data," Mr Kelly said.

"The size of the new round module builders on the picker and stripper make it possible to harvest more hectares per hour, as the module size has grown by more than five centimetres in diameter, to equate to a two per cent productivity gain per bale."

Mr Kelly said the company valued the Aussie cotton industry, which is why it made products dedicated to the Australian market.

"The Australian cotton industry is extremely important to us, hence our multi-year investment in testing our cotton equipment in the country's unique production conditions to ensure we deliver the power, efficiency and durability needed," Mr Kelly said

The CP770 and CS770 are also the first cotton harvesters to be offered by John Deere with the Generation 4 Display.

Noting the increased market requirement for traceability, John Deere has also focused on allowing growers to fulfil their requirements in that space.

Mr Kelly said the technology delivered by the CP770 and CS770 dovetailed precisely into John Deere's already enhanced Harvest ID (HID) technology, which uses the radio-frequency identification (RFID) reader to read module serial numbers embedded on the module wrap.

"Ultimately, this technology means there is improved reporting and seamless access to data related to cotton bales that can be shared to stakeholders right across the supply chain," he said.

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