Young scientists learn the ropes

Young scientists learn the ropes


Grain
The group of promising scientists at the commencement of their training in Rabat, Morocco.

The group of promising scientists at the commencement of their training in Rabat, Morocco.

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Young scientists from the subcontinent, Middle East and Africa have converged on Rabat for a wheat breeding workshop.

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YOUNG scientists from across the subcontinent, the Middle East and Africa have converged on Rabat, in Morocco, as part of the International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dryland Areas (ICARDA) wheat breeding training.

Under the expert eye of experienced wheat breeder Tadasse Wudelaw, the group of students will remain in North Africa for three weeks to learn more about their craft and also to forge international networks.

Young wheat breeders from national programs are chosen to attend the long-running training program to get a taste of both the new and old in the industry.

"We aim to give them a taste of both classical wheat breedingand emerging techniques, such as molecular marking," Dr Wudelaw said.

"There are also sessions on double haploid principles and speed breeding, along with quality analysis, integrated pest management and biometrics," he said.

Young wheat breeders visit the Marchouch research facility out of Rabat in Morocco.

Young wheat breeders visit the Marchouch research facility out of Rabat in Morocco.

Visiting Australian breeders Richard Trethowan, University of Sydney, and Allan Rattey, both addressed the scientists, who undertook theoretical and laboratory training in Rabat along with field excursions to the organisation's Marchouch farm.

The training session was officially opened by Australian ambassador to Morocco Berenice Owen-Jones.

* Gregor Heard travelled to Morocco with assistance from the Crawford Fund and with financial support from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Council on Australia Arab Relations.

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