Tyre-tech real game changer

Tractor and Machinery Association conference: Titan talk low sidewall tyre technology

Machinery
Tyre technology: Tractor and Machinery Association executive director Gary Northover with Titan International agriculture product manager Scott Sloan at the Annual TMA conference.

Tyre technology: Tractor and Machinery Association executive director Gary Northover with Titan International agriculture product manager Scott Sloan at the Annual TMA conference.

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Titan talked low sidewall tyre technology at the Tractor and Machinery Association conference.

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Low sidewall tyre technology was a hot topic at the Tractor and Machinery Association conference.

Titan International agricultural product manager Scott Sloan said LSW was originally developed for cars and had been adapted by the company for agricultural tyres in 2009.

"When we shorten the sidewall it gives a couple of inherent performance improvements," he said.

"If you think of the sidewall like a spring, if you shorten the sidewall you are shortening the spring, it actually dampens the effect of a tyre road loping."

Mr Sloan said road lope is the term used for the physical swaying and bouncing of a machine during road transport and Titan had conducted testing which measured the oscillation of the tyres, proving the benefit.

"As your ride along and hit a bump in the road, the tyre will start to do some bouncing, the conventional tyre will continue to oscillate and bounce, with a shorter sidewall you will introduce a natural dampening effect," he said.

Mr Sloan said other technologies such as Improved Flexion or Very-High Flexion, which allowed higher loads under lower tyre pressure, suffered from needing constant adjustment when used in conventional tyres.

"The problem with other deflection technologies is you have to rely on the end-user to adjust their inflation pressure every time they make an adjustment to their implement or tractor," he said.

"When you let the air out of the tyre, your footprint grows, more ground contact, less pressure and compaction, but the end user needs to maintain those inflation pressures to get the full advantage out of the tyre.

"With LSW all the tyres are actually VF technology, but with the tyre being physically different you don't need to worry about the inflation pressure."

Mr Sloan for tractors in the field the higher draft load the tractor can dig in and the conventional sidewalls can start to buckle.

"As the tyre is being pulled under a higher draft load the sidewalls are buckling and then when it releases you get a pop out," he said.

"The fix for that is putting air in the tyre which stiffens the sidewall and shortens the spring, creating more slip so you don't get the hop, unfortunately though when you get more slip, you have less tractor efficiency.

"With LSW because the tyre is physically different you don't get the buckling effect and your retain the power to the ground with the lower inflation pressure."

Mr Sloan said LSW have multiple benefits over tracks, particularly in terms of cost and reliability.

"We are showing their is a better way to spend money and get performance out of machines," he said.

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