Managing a farm machinery business through COVID

Managing a farm machinery business through COVID

Coronavirus
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There is a lot of uncertainty but one farm machinery manufacturer is hopeful he can continue to operate throughout the current crisis.

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Paul Ryan, Ryan Farming Machinery, is continuing to run his tillage equipment business in spite of the uncertainty of coronavirus.

Paul Ryan, Ryan Farming Machinery, is continuing to run his tillage equipment business in spite of the uncertainty of coronavirus.

RYAN Farming Machinery principal Paul Ryan has been dealing with the complexities of bringing in equipment from China for several years now and has said he is confident his business will manage to keep on top of things during the COVID-19 outbreak in Australia.

"We've currently got product on the water now coming from China and now we are just hopeful that it can all be unloaded at the wharves as per usual," Mr Ryan, whose company specialises in tillage equipment, said.

"The equipment will have been on the water for more than 14 days and all the protocols have been observed so we are confident things will work out."

Mr Ryan said it would be a difficult time in the machinery industry but said as a sole operator he hoped to be able to manage relatively well.

"I can still chat to clients over the phone and I'll still have the stock in the shed in Horsham where I am based to be able to be sent wherever so I think it all should be manageable."

Mr Ryan said he had been having equipment made in China for around four years due to the availability of better quality steel.

"Most foundries in Australia are iron foundries, not steel, and we've found the quality of the steel is superior to what we could get locally, it was not just a matter of going out to try and find the lowest cost solution."

"China supplies the steel for most of the major tillage manufacturers across the world."

Mr Ryan's equipment is wholly assembled in China before being shipped to Australia.

He admitted there were some anxious moments when China went into a heavy lockdown in its response to the original outbreak of coronavirus in Wuhan but said since then China's manufacturing sector had resumed and was getting closer to full capacity.

"There is obviously a lot of uncertainty at the moment but at present I am more concerned about getting the equipment off the boats in Australia than getting it loaded in China."

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