Crossfire recalling 890 quad bikes

Crossfire Motorcycles recalling 890 quad bikes due to non-compliancy issues

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Crossfire is recalling quad bikes from seven of its nine models, including X2 ATVs built between September 2020 and March 2021.

Crossfire is recalling quad bikes from seven of its nine models, including X2 ATVs built between September 2020 and March 2021.

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Australian quad bike dealer Crossfire Motorcycles has admitted to selling ATVs that did not meet stage one requirements of the mandatory Quad Bike Safety Standard.

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Australian quad bike dealer Crossfire Motorcycles has admitted to selling ATVs that did not meet stage one requirements of the mandatory Quad Bike Safety Standard.

The company is voluntarily recalling 890 quad bikes from seven of its nine models due to a number of compliancy issues.

Surveillance coordinated by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission earlier this year identified problems with non-compliant labels.

An ACCC investigation into Crossfire then uncovered issues including incorrect age recommendation warning labels, missing or non-compliant engine stop switches, missing reflex reflectors, and missing information in the owner's manuals.

Recalls have been issued for:

  • Kanga 90 ATVs built between August 2020 and June 2021
  • Trex 110 ATVs built between August 2020 and June 2021
  • Rover 125 ATVs built between August 2020 and January 2021
  • X2 ATVs built between September 2020 and March 2021
  • X300 ATVs built between October 2020 and January 2021
  • Mustang 250 ATVs built between August 2020 and March 2021
  • Territory 500 ATVs between September 2020 and March 2021

ACCC deputy chairman Mick Keogh said Crossfire's non-compliance presented a risk to quad bike operators, including children.

"Age warning labels in particular help parents make informed decisions when purchasing quad bikes," Mr Keogh said.

As a result, the ACCC has accepted a court-enforceable undertaking from Crossfire.

Crossfire has agreed to implement a consumer law compliance program, obtain independent test reports of its quad bikes, and report to the ACCC regularly about its safety compliance and the progress on its recalls.

Further action may be taken by the ACCC if Crossfire fails to meet these requirements.

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"Quad bike suppliers have now had two years to prepare for the new requirements of the safety standard and replace their old stock with fully compliant vehicles," Mr Keogh said.

"This should serve as a warning to all suppliers that they risk enforcement action if they supply quad bikes that do not meet the safety standard."

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